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Frequently Asked Questions
  • Is cross-contamination a common error in the home kitchen?
  • Should I use an antibacterial cleaner when I clean my kitchen?
  • What do you mean by 'cross contamination'?
  • Which is better, wooden or plastic cutting boards?

     

    Is cross-contamination a common error in the home kitchen?  

    We don’t know how often ready-to-eat foods are cross-contaminated with pathogens in the home.  However, the incidence ofCampylobacter infections gives clues that cross-contamination may be a frequent cause of foodborne illness.  Campylobacter is a common contaminant of poultry products and is relatively easy to kill by heat. Very few people say that they eat undercooked chicken.  It may be that many of theCampylobacter infections are caused by cross-contamination of kitchen equipment that was used to prepare raw poultry and then not cleaned before preparation of ready-to-eat foods.  

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    Should I use an antibacterial cleaner when I clean my kitchen?  

    Soap and water are usually adequate for cleaning the kitchen.  After preparing raw meat or chicken, use of an antibacterial cleaner provides extra safety.  Follow the directions on the label when you use these products.

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    What do you mean by 'cross contamination'?

    Cross-contamination means that pathogens, such as bacteria or viruses, are transferred onto foods that will receive no additional cooking.  The original source of the pathogens is usually foods that will be cooked such as raw poultry and meat.

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    Which is better, wooden or plastic cutting boards?  

    Plastic cutting boards are easier to clean, particularly for if you have a dishwasher.  It doesn’t matter so much what type of cutting board that you use – just be sure to clean it well after each use.  We recommend that you use several cutting boards when you are preparing a meat – one for raw meat/poultry and another for ready-to-eat foods.  Clean the board used for raw meat/poultry thoroughly and let it dry before you use it again.

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